CTO.org Logo


 CTO.org - Technology News Archive
Search...
Selected news feeds from CNET News.com, Computerworld, TechWeb, and Yahoo! News
Google

WWW CTO.org

Browse...
Fri, December 15, 2017
Thu, December 14, 2017
Wed, December 13, 2017
Tue, December 12, 2017
Mon, December 11, 2017
Sun, December 10, 2017
Sat, December 9, 2017

 Latest Technology News
Plus, discounts on almost every Star Wars PC game ever made.

Even though it's filled with redactions, the "Jacobs letter" still gives a glimpse into allegations of Uber's "illegal intelligence gathering."

A San Francisco animal shelter fires a Knightscope security robot after a fracas over its role with nearby homeless.

Ford is setting its EV and autonomous vehicle teams up in Detroit's hippest neighborhood.

The company's budget Galaxy A8 and A8+ for 2018 are said to be preparing an appearance in Las Vegas in January.

The German firm sees a future where touchscreens and capacitive sensors bring further functionality to your steering wheel.

On Android, Google's navigation service offers more of a helping hand when you're using public transit.

More than a million people are playing the viral gaming hit PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds on the game console, and a promotion could attract more.

Take a fresh look at Mars with a European Space Agency image that brings the planet into rare focus.

"Reservoir Dogs," "Doctor Who," and "Zodiac" arrive on Amazon's streaming service.

Samsung is rumored to unveil its next big phone in Barcelona.

It's bringing a Le Mans race car to the street.

Commentary: Chamath Palihapitiya, who suggested that he doesn't let his kids use Facebook, clarifies his views. On Facebook.

So long, AOL Instant Messenger. Today is the day the beloved messaging service finally logs off.

31 new originals, tons of great movies like "The Godfather" and more hit Netflix in the new year.

Powered by

CNET News.com

Can you imagine someone crazy enough to carry around two smartphones? That'-™s two phones to keep charged, two phones to keep track of, two phones to stow in your pocket, purse or carry-on. Madness!(Insider Story)


Become a spreadsheet master
excel 2016 mac icon

Image by Microsoft

Are you the nerd at the holiday party sequestered at the kitchen table, surrounded by empties, trading tips with the other spreadsheet junkie in town? You grouse over VLOOKUP, high five each other'-™s complex formula strings, and bemoan chart failures that made you scream. But this is the most fun you'-™ve had since you got your Ham Radio License.


An uptick in job openings for technologists with blockchain development skills " continued through the last quarter of 2017.

Blockchain developers rank second among the top 20 fastest-growing job skills, and job postings for workers with those skills have more than doubled this year.

Next in the list of fastest-growing job skills is another blockchain-related topic: Bitcoin cryptocurrency developers.

Taking second fiddle only to robotics specialists, blockchain technologists are advertising their services for as much as $150 per hour, according to Upwork, an employment site that specializes in freelance workers.


Once upon a time if you wanted employees to collaborate you'd probably encourage them to use Internet Relay Chat (IRC). But about four years ago Slack appeared on the scene, and since then it's been eating IRC's lunch. That's because it's much easier to install, get up and running, and use than IRC, making it massively popular with nontechies. And thanks to a well-documented API it's easy to integrate with other programs and services. That means it's customizable and infinitely extensible, which makes it popular with developers.

But, ultimately, Slack is just a group communication tools, albeit a very nice one. And there are plenty of alternatives." In fact, many of the biggest players in the industry, from Microsoft to Google to Facebook are pushing their own tools and the number of available options is quickly growing.


Apple and Cisco have struck yet another blow for enterprise IT. They know that iOS is the most secure mobile solution, but that'-™s not everything because mobile threats are incredibly complex these days.

The enigma code

Here'-™s a scenario: You work in an enterprise with perhaps 1,000 other employees. One morning, perhaps 50 of you woke to find an authentic-seeming email in your in-box that requests you click on a link to update some system related to the work you do. While many employees remembered not to click on that link, a small number did click. No one thought too much of the email '-” spam is frequent and most just thought the mail was aimed at them.


Mozilla on Thursday touted Firefox Quantum, the browser upgrade launched one month ago, as its biggest release ever and said early adoption metrics have been "super encouraging."

But preliminary browser measurements taken by the U.S. government show only a small increase in Firefox's domestic usage since Quantum debuted on Nov. 14.

That did not deter Mozilla, however.

"In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170 [million] people around the world," Nick Nguyen, the company's top Firefox executive, wrote in a post to the firm's primary blog. "We're just getting started and early returns are super encouraging."


It's several Decembers ago, and this IT contractor pilot fish is set to start a new job at a big company as a SQL reporting specialist.

"I got word that I would be hired around the 16th, but we had to wait for the purchase order to go through before I could start," says fish.

"It finally came through on the morning of the Thursday before Christmas, and I had to drive to the facility some 50 miles away that afternoon to get my ID badge created, because the badge office wasn't going to be open on Friday or the week between Christmas and New Year's Day."

Which is when fish's first day at the new job falls, naturally.

Fish's family has plans for a get-together with relatives in New York state that week, but the new gig means a change in plans: Fish's wife and younger son head for New York, while fish and his older son stay in town.


'Tis the season for kicking back, crankin' up the fireplace, and finding some time-saving new tricks for that pretty slab o' glass in your pocket.

Enhanced efficiency is one heck of a holiday treat, after all '-” and one that keeps paying off for months to come. Hey, productivity matters, and there's never a shortage of fresh Android shortcuts and enhancements just waiting to be embraced.

In case you missed any of 'em the first go-round or maybe just didn't have time to try everything out, here are some of my favorite Android tips and tricks from 2017. Pour yourself some cocoa, polish up the ol' Festivus pole, and give yourself the gift of finely tuned technology.


It should be clear by now that Apple'-™s big bet on the iPhone X is working out just fine. Millions of people appear to be picking them up, but what does the new device tell us about the next decade of smartphones?

Face, the obvious

Biometric ID has come of age.

From Touch ID fingerprint sensors to face recognition systems and whatever comes beyond. It'-™s not impossible to speculate that one day our solutions will even be able to recognise us through a combination of biometric signals: fingerprint, face, pulse, even by blood type as mobile sensor development accelerates.


The TP-LINK HS100 smart plug" is quite simply a power outlet that you can control from anywhere. Using your smartphone, you can turn devices on & off, set programs to turn them on & off at set times while you're away, or engage a "countdown timer" which powers the switch off after a set amount of time. Installation is simple -- just plug a device into your smart plug and connect to your wifi network. The HS100 is also compatible with Amazon Alexa, for voice control. Buy multiple plugs and get creative.


Windows 7's security rollups, the most comprehensive of the fixes it pushes out each Patch Tuesday, have almost doubled in size since Microsoft revamped the veteran operating system's update regimen last year.

According to Microsoft's own data, what it calls the "Security Quality Monthly Rollup" (rollup from here on) grew by more than 70% within the first dozen issued updates. From its October 2016 inception, the x86 version of the update increased from 72MB to 124.4MB, a 73% jump. Meanwhile, the always-larger 64-bit version went from an initial 119.4MB to 203.2MB 12 updates later, representing a 70% increase.

The swelling security updates were not, in themselves, a surprise. Last year, when Microsoft announced huge changes to how it serviced Windows 7, it admitted that rollups would put on pounds as the months pass. "The Rollups will start out small, but we expect that these will grow over time,' Nathan Mercer, a Microsoft product marketing manager, said at the time. Mercer's explanation: "A Monthly Rollup in October will include all updates for October, while November will include October and November updates, and so on."


This IT project is highly visible, and management is taking no chances. "To ensure that it is managed properly, execs contract with a highly advertised consulting firm to provide a thundering herd of expert project managers," says a pilot fish on the project.

"Never mind the fact that our corporate PMs usually do quite well."

As is always the case, there's lots of time every day that the regular employees spend on nonproject tasks they're required to do. Fish doesn't report that as project time, and he instructs the rest of his team to do the same.

And it's not long before, one by one, the thundering herd arrives at fish's desk. "You're short on hours! Why aren't you reporting your time?" each one asks.


plans to release an a new wireless charging product in January that will be capable of 15-watt power transfers through a 1.5-in. thick solid surface and provide support for new Apple iPhones and other Qi-enabled devices.

Charging Spot 4.0 is a new charging hardware product that requires no drilling and that can be installed under a table surface. Powermat's new SmartInductive technology, which includes firmware, integrated circuits and charging coils, will allow the new Charging Spot to offer higher power transfers over longer distances than previously availble.

The new charger will allow users to simply place enabled mobile devices atop a desk, for example, to begin receiving power.


Blockchain is poised to change IT in much the same way open-source software did a quarter of a century ago. And in the same way that Linux took more than a decade to become a cornerstone in modern application development, Blockchain will take years to become a lower cost, more efficient way to share information between open and private networks.

But the hype around this seemingly new, secure electronic ledger is real. In essence, blockchain represents a new paradigm for the way information is shared and tech vendors and companies are rushing to figure out how they can use the distributed ledger technology to save time and admin costs. Numerous companies this year have been rolling out pilot programs and real-world projects across a variety of industries - everything from financial services to healthcare to mobile payments.


It's the most disruptive technology since the arrival of the Internet.

Or maybe it's the next Linux, an open-source technology that offers great promise, but somehow never seems to make it to the mainstream world.

"It," in this case, is blockchain '-" the buzz-worthy distributed ledger technology that first came into widespread use with Bitcoin" represents a new paradigm for the way information is shared. FinTech firms are embracing it and a variety of companies are already rushing to figure out how they can use it to save time and admin costs, according to Computerworld Senior Reporter Lucas Mearian.


Powered by

Computerworld

test

BYTE is starting a new series, to bring back the issues you loved in print from 1975 to 1998. Initially we have the first two issues and four others from 1984, 1985 and 1986.

Security experts urge companies to implement two-factor authentication, VPNs, and graduated permission levels to better protect customer data from hackers.

Microsoft admits that it doesn't encrypt all server-to-server communications, opening the way for the NSA and others to access the data flow.

Affordable Care Act site has faced a relatively low volume of attacks, compared with other federal websites.

Google's Gmail app for iPad and iPhone gets new features and iOS 7's design language.

Amazon CTO Werner Vogels announces PostgreSQL database service, new instance types, use of solid state disk to speed I/Os.

As software eclipses hardware, it's dawning on enterprises that they need API programs. Here's where to begin.

Authors Guild's claim of copyright infringement gets shot down in a surprise ruling.

The goal is allow home monitoring devices and mobile health apps communicate more easily healthcare providers.

Google's personal assistant software gets upgraded to better manage owners' lives and understand natural language requests.

Android smartphones owners can now pay for goods and services by tapping their device to Isis terminals at 1.3 million locations nationwide.

LinkedIn pushes customized content with the integration of news curation app Pulse for desktop and mobile versions.

Hacker grabbed 860,000 passwords for fun, but promises not to leak or use them to harm people.

VMware wants to move into cloud computing? Guess what, Amazon's moving into desktop virtualization.

Powered by

TechWeb

testt'-¦.



Nicomi Stewart, a mother in Rochester, New York, is '-'disgusted'-" after an automated call sent to her phone from the city'-™s school district mispronounced her daughter'-™s name as a racial slur.



You may soon get to say a lot more on Twitter. The social media giant announced it is testing a longer character limit. The change will extend the current 140 characters to 280 for all languages except Japanese, Chinese and Korean. Users won'-™t see this change right away, though. Only a small percentage will be testing it at first, and according to the company, it is just a test and there is no guarantee this change will be available to everyone. Via Business Insider:" http://www.businessinsider. ...



Mac OS High Sierra (macOS 10.13)." As the new name suggests, it'-™s just a refinement of last year'-™s Mac OS Sierra. In fact," you" could sum up what's new in an article about as short as" this one.



Want to add some cool sound effects or music to your YouTube video (or any video)?



Facebook has a "realistic opportunity" to enter China in 2018, Mizuho analyst James Lee wrote in a note to clients on Tuesday. Lee came to the conclusion after meeting "various industry contacts" in China during a recent trip. Facebook's recent appointment of an executive to manage relations with China will help the company "understand the regulatory requirement and negotiate Facebook's operating structure in China," said Lee in the note, a copy of which was obtained by Business Insider.



Apple is expected to include wireless charging as a core feature in the iPhones it launches on...



Apple's 10th anniversary iPhone is nearly upon us. Here's everything we expect from what could be Apple's most important product in years.



Apple's App Store is getting a major update in iOS 11, and it's going to make finding new apps far better.



Equifax was hacked and lost the information of 143 million Americans, and they need to tell us how.



Apple's iPhone 8 is nearly upon us, but not everyone is psyched. Here are the best alternatives for Apple's upcoming iPhone.



Samsung's Galaxy Note 8 is a wonderful smartphone, but its high price is a tough pill to swallow.



Yahoo's David Pogue has a sneaky way you can create a universal link to a Facebook item so that you can send or post to anyone.



There are some gadgets that are just too cool for us Americans.



More laptop makers are pushing the limits of design and performance, but high-resolution panels are hurting their batteries.



Powered by

Yahoo! News

Copyright (c) 2017 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved
CTO.org is a private website, and is not affiliated with any companies or organizations.


Copyright © 2003-2010 CTO.org All Rights Reserved.